Mira Sorvino Opens Up About Decision To Expose Harvey Weinstein: ‘I Could No Longer Remain Silent’

Mira Sorvino was one of the first women to expose predator Harvey Weinstein — and, for that, she should be applauded.

We mean, it took A LOT of bravery for the Mighty Aphrodite actress to go on the record for Ronan Farrow‘s New Yorker exposé, especially as the unsavory incident still weighed heavily on her. What an inspiration!

Related: Claire Forlani Escaped Weinstein’s Advances FIVE TIMES

For a profile published by TIME, the 50-year-old has since opened up about the specifics behind her decision to speak out against the indie movie mogul. On the sexual misconduct she suffered at Harvey’s hands, Miz Sorvino shared:

“It has been a real struggle to come forward with my story. I have lived in vague fear of Harvey Weinstein for over 20 years. At the time I don’t think I even knew what happened — him using business-related situations to try and press himself sexually on a young woman in his employ — qualified as sexual harassment. But as a woman who routinely advocates for women and girls who have been victimized in my role as Goodwill Ambassador with the United Nations, and as a mother, I could no longer remain silent.”

Honestly, that was such a brave decision. According to Mira, she had previously recounted her experience to a female employee at The Weinstein Company and was rebuked for bringing it up. She continued:

“When Ronan first reached out and said, ‘It’s about Harvey Weinstein,’ I started crying and shaking. After all those years, that is how much power Weinstein held over me. Many sleepless nights — literally waking at 2 a.m. and not being able to sleep the rest of the night until it was time to take my kids to school — followed.”

How awful. So when Ronan asked for Mira’s help, she was willing to tell her story, but considered sharing it anonymously. The New York native added:

“After some time, I agreed to help Ronan, but I wasn’t sure I could put my name out there. I was terrified of retaliation, not only professional but the safety of my children. I also felt my story was insignificant compared to others Ronan described. He always gently reminded me that my incidents bore hallmarks of a specific m.o. — the ‘meetings’ in hotel rooms, the use of massage as the first salvo, the misleading promise of business discussions that quickly evaporated, the bullish physical and psychological brazenness. My experience was remarkably similar to testimonies that described worse sexual abuse and that if I came forward I would help corroborate other brave women’s stories.”

Ultimately, the Oscar winner’s “conscience and desire to break away from the tyranny of intimidation” and the fear that her silence put “young girls and women (and boys and men) in danger,” convinced her it was time to speak her truth. However, this doesn’t mean the A-lister didn’t have doubts:

“For another 24 hours, I second-guessed my decision, wondering if I would ever work again, wondering if being a whistleblower would mean being blacklisted. But once I knew the story was going to print and it was irrevocable, an enormous peace washed over me — a sense that finally I had taken my personal power back form a man who’s made me scared every time I have seen him in public. My fear of what could be done has been outweighed by an overwhelming sense that I’m living with full courage and honesty.”

Bravo! While Mr. Weinstein has stated via a rep that “any allegations of non-consensual sex” are “unequivocally” false, he’s since entered a treatment program for sex addiction.

Be sure to read Mira’s FULL profile for yourself HERE.

[Image via FayesVision/WENN.]